History of Soccer world


A group of young men playing a game of football

Soccer world history is the complete history of soccer or football as it’s called in parts of the world, including its origin and evolution into one of today’s most popular sports.

The most popular theory about the origin of soccer tells us that it all started when ancient Romans used to throw an animal’s skin from one end to another as a way of showing their power over that particular area.

As the years passed, the people from those areas started playing that game with a ball instead of an animal skin and it evolved into a very popular sport by the 19th century.

Many games were played during those times but they looked a bit different.

Soccer World Cup:

A group of baseball players playing a football game

The most famous of all games was the one played in England during the 19th century, and that’s when the name soccer (or football) got very famous. This game was called “football” because players would use their feet only to move the ball around and score goals.

It soon spread out from there to other countries in Europe, and in the early 20th century it was introduced to North America after immigrants from England went there.

The Beginning of Soccer World Cup:

A man with a football ball on a field

No one really knows who invented the soccer world cup, but there are some records about the first time when the idea of a world cup for this sport came up. It all started in 1904 when an English citizen named James Lipton organized a tournament between nations from Europe. He called it the International Football Association Board (IFAB).

The First Soccer World Cup:

There was no official world cup for soccer until 1930. Back then, the idea was to make the sport more popular and help people easily identify and compete with each other.

The first world cup was played in Uruguay because it had the money to fund that kind of event, and there were many teams who wanted to participate.

That year 14 countries competed for the world cup trophy. The British team made it all the way to the finals but there they lost against Uruguay by a score of 4-2.

The first world cup begins:

When soccer was introduced, a lot of countries in Africa and Asia were fighting for independence from Europe. That didn’t happen until the 1950s when those countries started gaining their freedom.

In 1954 France became the first European country to host a world cup, and there were 16 teams participating that year. By 1958 all European countries were allowed to participate, and the number went up to 24 teams.

The first world cup outside Europe happened in South America in 1978, Mexico was the host country that year. The number of participants grew every year until 1994 when a record-breaking number of teams (including Canada) participated. That’s also when all soccer associations around the world started pushing the idea of a real soccer world cup.

The first world cup outside Europe:

European countries ruled the sport for more than 100 years and they continue to lead it even now after all those years. But in 1994 Brazil hosted the first-ever soccer world cup outside European soil, and players from many other countries got to play against some of the best teams in the world.

It was a way for those less popular countries to show what they could do and raise their rankings on a global level.

The first world cup outside Europe:

Brazil hosted the first-ever soccer world cup outside European soil, and players from many other countries got to play against some of the best teams in the world. It was a way for those less popular countries to show what they could do and raise their rankings on a global level.

The 1994 soccer world cup in Brazil is just one of many world cups that will take place during this 21st century. The competition has increased so much since its first days when only European teams were involved.

Right now there are more than 200 national soccer teams on five different continents, so it’s only natural the competition is getting harder and harder.

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